• With its distinctive green dome, the Prime Minister's Department Complex has become an icon in Putrajaya. Built in 1997, the complex houses the ofices of the Prime Minister, his Deputy as well as several other government departments and agencies. The complex incorporates various architectural influences, including European, Islamic and traditional Malay.
    PERDANA PUTRA
  • With its distinctive green dome, the Prime Minister's Department Complex has become an icon in Putrajaya. Built in 1997, the complex houses the ofices of the Prime Minister, his Deputy as well as several other government departments and agencies. The complex incorporates various architectural influences, including European, Islamic and traditional Malay.
    PERDANA PUTRA
  • With its distinctive green dome, the Prime Minister's Department Complex has become an icon in Putrajaya. Built in 1997, the complex houses the ofices of the Prime Minister, his Deputy as well as several other government departments and agencies. The complex incorporates various architectural influences, including European, Islamic and traditional Malay.
    PERDANA PUTRA
  • With its distinctive green dome, the Prime Minister's Department Complex has become an icon in Putrajaya. Built in 1997, the complex houses the ofices of the Prime Minister, his Deputy as well as several other government departments and agencies. The complex incorporates various architectural influences, including European, Islamic and traditional Malay.
    PERDANA PUTRA
  • With its distinctive green dome, the Prime Minister's Department Complex has become an icon in Putrajaya. Built in 1997, the complex houses the ofices of the Prime Minister, his Deputy as well as several other government departments and agencies. The complex incorporates various architectural influences, including European, Islamic and traditional Malay.
    PERDANA PUTRA
  • Traditionally, the Keris held such a unique bond with its owner that, amazingly, it is said that a marriage could have been solemnised with the Keris as proxy in place of its owner. A sultan could even have sent his Keris along with his emissaries as a symbol of himself, ensuring respect and that his wishes were carried out. Given this incredible bond it was vital that the carver of the Keris spent a great amount of time designing it to specifically match the character of its owner. To create such an item requires immerse skill and understandably is said to be the pinnacle item for a Malay carver to produce.
    KERIS MAKING